Tag Archives: population

2021.53.66

Digitised copy of List of inhabitants of Tiree, 1792. A tabulated form records the number of inhabitants per farm by: males; females; under 10 years; from 10 to 20 years; 20 to 50 years; 50 to 70 years; 70 to 80 years; 80 to 90 years; 90 to 100 years; above 100; total. The rest of the census records the names and ages of inhabitants in each occupied dwelling in the island.

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Click to view a record for this item on Inveraray’s online catalogue.

From the archives of the Dukes of Argyll at Inveraray Castle, made available through the Written in the Landscape project.

2021.53.58

Digitised copy of List of inhabitants in the island of Tiree, 1776.

In 1776 the Duke of Argyll directed his chamberlain in Tiree to undertake a census of the island. The census recorded the names and ages of inhabitants in each occupied dwelling in the island. The number of cows and horses owned is sometimes recorded, and whether or not they were well disposed towards the Duke of Argyll (e.g. ‘sober and honest’, ‘a good tenant’). There is no transcript for this item.

Click to view a record for this item on Inveraray’s online catalogue.

From the archives of the Dukes of Argyll at Inveraray Castle, made available through the Written in the Landscape project.

2021.53.55

Digitised copy of Instructions for the chamberlain of Tiree, 1771. These instructions were sent from the Duke of Argyll and include: rents; over population of Tiree; establishing a fishing village; present system of husbandry including runrigs, introducing wheeled carriages, sand blowing, cutting bent, pulling barley, gredden, distilleries, introducing flax and hemp; mills; the minister’s Glebe; taking bear [barley] in payments of rent; draining lochs; roads in Tiree; selling of wood. There is no transcript available for this item.

Click to view a record for this item on Inveraray’s online catalogue.

From the archives of the Dukes of Argyll at Inveraray Castle, made available through the Written in the Landscape project.

2021.53.54

Digitised copy of Remarks on the island of Tiree, 1771. The remarks made by the document fall under the following headings: The island over-peopled; the propriety of establishing a fishing village in Tiry [Tiree]; plan of executing the design of building a village in Tiry; method of tillage and cultivation; runrig abusive; too many horses and servants employed in plowing and other works of a farm; Tiry a fit country for wheel carriages; division of large runrig farms into smaller ones proper; the small tenants occupy too little land; remedy proposed; by seting the thirdes of the island to gentlemen farmers; and the other two thirds to small tenants; common pastures prejudicial; they should be divided on the adjacent farms; land: blowing of the reef and encroachment on it should be prevented; sand blowing; Tiry over stocked with sheep; which causes sand blowing; cutting bent encourages sand blowing; flax and hemp little cultivated in Tiry should be encouraged; pulling barley from the root hurtful; milns [mills] of Tiry on a bad footing; a new miln necessary; a wind miln might be of use; greddan a most barbarous custom; minister’s Glebe too large; distilling should be discouraged in the most effectual manner; bad consequences of it; a method of collection the rents of Tiry without much arrears; fresh water lochs easily drained; roads and landing places should be more attended to in Tiry; factors should be restricted from demanding services as a duty prestaball [prestable] to them by the tenants.

There is no transcript available for this item.

Click to view a record for this item on Inveraray’s online catalogue.

From the archives of the Dukes of Argyll at Inveraray Castle, made available through the Written in the Landscape project.

2021.53.46

Digitised copy of Number of inhabitants in the island of Tiree by James Turnbull, 1768. In this document, Turnbull records: number of mail lands; holding of horses, cows and sheep, soums; sousing of rye, barley, oats; increase of rye, barley oats; number of tenants and hinds (men and women);  number of cottagers in each farm (men and women); number of men above twelve years of age excluding the tenants and cottagers; number of women above twelve years of age excluding the tenants and cottagers; number of boys below twelve years of age; number of girls below twelve years of age; total inhabitants in each farm; numbers of manufacturers in each farm (included in the preceding columns) men weavers, women weavers, lint dressers, carpenters, blacksmiths, tailors, total of manufacturers in each farm. There is no transcript available for this item.

Click to view a record for this item on Inveraray’s online catalogue.

From the archives of the Dukes of Argyll at Inveraray Castle, made available through the Written in the Landscape project.

2021.53.33

Digitised copy of Observations on Tiree by Dr Walker, 1765. Dr Walker’s observations are arranged under the following headings: situation, extent, hills, harbour, tides, springs, sea, soil, rieve [reef], climate, crops, inhabitants, longevity, diseases, antiquities, agriculture, inclosures, cattle, grain, change of seed, hay, manures, turneps [turnips], price of commodities, price of labour, exports and imports, manufacture, fishery, hemp, natural productions, marble, copper, porphyry. There is no transcript for this item but see 1997.273.1.

The Rev Dr John Walker, minister of Moffat and a pioneer of scientific botany and geology, was sent to the Hebrides in 1764 and 1771 by the Commission for Annexed Estates to report on the social conditions, population and the state of manufacture, agriculture and fisheries.

Click to view a record for this item on Inveraray’s online catalogue.

From the archives of the Dukes of Argyll at Inveraray Castle, made available through the Written in the Landscape project.

2017.8.2

Softback report ‘Profiles: Health and Community in Rural and Urban Argyll’ using data from the Rural-Urban Morbidity Recording Project (2001-2004), by Jane Farmer et al, 2004. The profiles include the work of health professionals, people’s health status and their use of health services. They also highlight strengths and weaknesses of living in the local communities – centering on factors which might be related to health. See pages 17-23 for data from Tiree.

2017.26.1

Softback book ‘Correspondence from July, 1846, to February, 1847, Relating to the Measures Adopted for the Relief of the Distress in Scotland…’ Great Britain Treasury, 2012. Government correspondence about Famine Relief in the Highlands. Includes separate index listing references to Tiree.

Click here to view index 2017.26.1 Tiree references

2017.6.4

Hardback book ‘Gaelic Scotland: The Transformation of a Culture Region’ by W. J. Withers, 1988. Covers the process of cultural change in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, particularly during the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. (Including policies of successive governments, the decline of the Gaelic language, and the Clearances.) Tiree mentioned pages 8, 181, 209, 214, 219, 225, 241, 285, 357, 359, 373-5 & 380.