Tag Archives: ships

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2017.8.1

Softback book ‘No Shame in Fear’ by Alex C. MacLean, 2016. Alex C. Maclean was born on the Isle of Tiree in 1923, and lived there until the age of fourteen, when he went to sea. This is a first-hand account of the WW2 Atlantic convoys and the devastation of war. Stalked by German U-boats, cast adrift in a lifeboat, it also tells of the difficulties of the post-war period, in building a decent family life and coming to terms with his own history back on Tiree. Foreword by Donald S. Murray.

2017.5.1

Text and images from a presentation about newspaper articles about emigration to Canada in 1849, including an advert in the Glasgow Herald for passage on the fast sailing ship Charlotte, departing from Glasgow for Quebec and Montreal, and a notice issued by Her Majesty’s Emigration Officer refuting a “scandalous and unfounded statement” published in the Examiner newspaper about the poor conditions aboard The Charlotte.

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2016.58.4

Page from the Official Log Book and Account of Voyages and Crew of the Mary Stewart, 1916, giving the owner and master as Donald MacLean, Scarinish (b.1860). Ports visited during the half-year 22 July 1915 to 27th November 1915 are Ayr, Tiree, Ardrossan and Colonsay.  The remains of the Mary Stewart can still be seen in Scarinish Harbour.

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2016.58.1

Colour photograph of a painting of the ‘Mary Stewart’ in full sail. The original painting is in the family of David Roberts (1849-1897), a native of  Anglesey, who was the master on the Mary Stewart, and possibly part owner, from about 1886 to 1897. The remains of the Mary Stewart can still be seen in Scarinish Harbour.

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2014.53.2

PowerPoint presentation about Captain Donald MacKinnon, Heanish (1827-1867), who captained the winning tea clipper ‘Taeping’ to victory in the Great China Tea Race of 1866. Used to illustrate a talk given on Tiree in 2012 by Lloyd Pitcher, an Australian descendent. Includes biographical and genealogical information.

2016.2.28

Royal Navy and Royal Marines next of kin casualty card used by relatives of Navy personnel during WWII to notify them of their injury or death during an air raid. The next of kin is listed as niece Mary Brown McDonald of Mannal who was a Wren on board HMS Lochailort. HMS Lochailort, formerly Lochailort House, was requisitioned by the Navy in 1942. Found amongst the belongings of the MacDonald/Campbell/Brown family of Mannal House.

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2015.46.2

Two small identical cards collected from Brooke Bond tea packets in the late 1960’s, showing an illustration of the tea clipper ‘Taeping’ on one side and with information on the other. The Taeping was captained by Donald MacKinnon, Heanish, during the Great China Tea Race of 1866.

2015.46.2 taeping

2015.46.1

Oval, wood-framed profile of Captain Donald MacKinnon, Heanish, moulded from white wax in 1867. Captain MacKinnon was captain of the tea clipper ‘Taeping’ which won the Great China Tea Race of 1866. The portrait is believed to have been made by William Murray of Glasgow, whose daughter, Margaret Anne Murray, married Donald MacKinnon in 1855. William Murray is known to have made wax and plaster portraits of his relatives as gifts, and probably sent this one to Captain MacKinnon to celebrate his success in the race. After Captain MacKinnon died aboard ‘SS Roman’ in Table Bay, South Africa in 1867, the plaque was most likely still among his possessions aboard ‘Taeping’, and would have been retrieved by his wife when the ship returned to London.

2015.46.1

 

The portrait hung on the wall of the donor’s mother’s home (near Oban?) for many years, from at least 1970 to 2015. The family connection is not certain although there is a Flora MacKinnon born around the 1760s in the family tree, and who may have been a relation of Captain MacKinnon’s grandfather.

 

 

2015.46.1 back

 

When the portrait arrived at An Iodhlann, the wax was broken into many pieces and the label on the back had been cut out. It was sent to the Scottish Conservation Studio at Hopetoun House, Queensferry for restoration, where conservators discovered that there had been two previous attempts to repair it, once with candle wax and once with sellotape.

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