Tag Archives: place names

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2016.44.6

Extract from Archaeology Ireland magazine, Autumn 2015: ‘Decoding Finn mac Cumaill’s Places’ by E FitzPatrick, R Hennesy, P Naessens and JF Nagy. An academic interpretation of European place-names in relation to the traditional Celtic tales of the warrior-hunter Finn mac Cumaill and his fian (wild band), which are historically popular among the Gaelic-speaking people of Scotland, Ireland and Isle of Man.

2017.17.5

West Highland Notes and Queries, August 2016, published by the The Society of West Highland & Island Historical Research Ltd, Coll. Articles include ‘An Account of the Island of Coll: Grimsary’; Myth, History and Genetic Genealogy: Ailpein, Chriogair, Mhic Gille Chonaill; Ranald MacAllan Og; Place-names in the Argyllshire Valuation of 1751; Who was Florence MacLean (1365-1430)?; Highland Tacksmen’s use of Gaelic in the Nineteenth Century.

2016.67.4

Hardback book ‘Transactions of The Gaelic Society of Inverness, Volume XVII, 1890-91’, 1892. See ‘Sgoil nan eun, no, mac an fhucadair’ tale by John Gregorson Campbell. (Page 58) Donation label ‘Tiree High School: This book was donated by Gordon D. Donald’.

2014.58.2

Booklet `Rathad an Isein / The Bird`s Road`

Small booklet by Anne Campbell, Lewis, listing the Gaelic names and terms for features of Lewis moorlands and for working there (mostly peat-cutting).

2014.39.1

Notes regarding audio recordings made on Tiree in 1972 and 1974

Two folders of handwritten notes made by Eric Cregeen while he was recording Tiree people speaking onto cassette tape during 1972 and 1974, plus a map of Balephuil, Balinoe and Barrapol annotated with the names of people living in each house. People recorded in notes: Donald Sinclair, Hector Kennedy – Balephuil, John Brown – Balephuil, John MacLean – Kilmoluaig, John MacLean – Cornaigbeg. Subjects covered include ancestry, Gaelic prose and songs, people living nearby, second sight, place names, shebeens, building construction, poverty, weather, schools, food, shops, water supplies, emigrants, rents, skeleton, confrontations, ferries and ships, literacy, crofts, Pairc na Coille, wars, Land Leagues, churches, illnesses.

2013.176.2

Text `You Say iodh, I Say vist`, 2013 (version 1)

Text about the occurrence of Norse place-names on Tiree and the implication that there was once a thriving and long-lasting population of Scandinavian settlers in southern Scotland. Also stored on computer under `Exhibitions and Texts`. (later versions are available digitally)

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