Tag Archives: mixed farming

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2002.100.1

Audio cassette recording of Ailig MacArthur, Heylipol, interviewed by Maggie Campbell in Heylipol on 24/5/2002.

Maggie Campbell talks to Ailig MacArthur (Ailig a’ Chìobair) of Heylipol in 2002 about his work as fireman at Tiree airport and the different types of service planes used, crofting and how its affected by the Environmentally Sensitive Area scheme and the grant system, how crofts are being amalgamated into farms, cattle sales and the local wildlife especially geese, the shops in Balemartine and Balephuil and the shop vans, story-telling. Tha Ailig Mac Artair (Ailig a’ Chìobair) a’ bruidhinn ri Magaidh Chaimbeul ann an 2002, mu ’n obair a bh’ aige aig Port Adhair Thiriodh, nuair a bha e na fhear-smalaidh, na h-itealan a bha air an cleachdadh, croitearachd agus mar a tha an sgeama an ‘Environmentally Sensitive Area’, a’ beantal do ’n eilean, mar tha croitean air an cur còmhla mar bhaile-fhearainn, fèill cruidh, eunlainn an eilean, gu sònraichte na geòidh, bùthan ann am Baile Mhàrtainn agus Bail’ a’ Phuill, carabadan agus naidheachdan.

2002.90.1

Audio cassette recording of Hector MacPhail interviewed by his daughter Winnifred Dowl in Ontario in July 1979 and again in June 1982.

Hector MacPhail talks to his daughter Winnifred Dell in July 1979 and June 1983 about his early childhood memories of Tiree, emigrating with his family to Ontario, Canada in 1903, his life and work in Canada and buying his own farm in 1920, and his family.

1997.156.6

Two men building a corn stack

Photograph of two men building a corn stack.

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Courtesy of Mrs Mairi Campbell

The two men are building a corn stack or ‘mulan’ which will provide winter feeding for horses, cattle and hens and seed for spring sowing. In the background is a row of haystacks. Corn stacks were built with the heads of the sheaves to the centre so the finished stack contained a column of seed.

Four sheaves were placed upright in the centre with further sheaves added around the centre, working clockwise. The sheaves were always kept with the seed uppermost so any moisture would run away from it down the straw.

The diameter of the stack was carefully measured using a special rope, either six or seven fathoms long, marked with a knot at one end and a block at the other. The stack was re-measured every two rows to keep it straight. These traditional methods are still in use today by a few crofters on the island.

Black and white photograph of building a cornstack at Whitehouse.

The two men are building a corn stack which will provide winter feeding for horses, cattle and hens and seed for spring sowing. In the background is a row of haystacks. At harvest time, the cut corn would be bundled by hand into sheaves, six of which would be stood together to form stooks. When sufficiently dry, the stooks would be transported by horse and cart to the stackyard. Corn stacks were built with the heads of the sheaves to the centre so the finished stack contained a column of seed. These traditional methods are still in use today by a few crofters on the island.

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