Tag Archives: mills and millers

2006.101.1

Newsletter `An Tirisdeach`, No. 373, 29/7/2006.

Local news and events including the turning of the mill wheel at Cornaig, photos and results from the Agricultural Show, Alistair Boyd competing in the Mongol rally, the results of the Tiree Association sports day and an update from the coucillor Ian Gillies and Tiree Rural Development.

2006.37.1

The mill lade at Cornaig

Photograph of the mill lade at Cornaig.

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The mill at Cornaig was powered by water from Loch Bhasapol. Drainage into the loch from Kilmoluaig sliabh was controlled by the miller using a small dam. He could also control the level of the loch by using a sluice-gate at the top of the mill lade.

The water was led down a sluice to the vertical wheel, which was ‘breast-driven’, hitting the wheel halfway down. This was less efficient that an overshot wheel where the water hit the wheel higher up but was the best that could be achieved as the loch level is only slightly higher than the mill.

The amount of water hitting the wheel determined the speed at which it turned. The miller could vary this by raising or lowering a flap at the bottom of the lade, which directed more or less water on to the wheel.

Colour photograph of the mill lade at Cornaigmore.

The mill lade at Cornaigmore taken by Dr John Holliday in 2003.

2005.115.2

Cornaig mill in 1962

Photograph of the interior of Cornaig mill in 1962.

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Courtesy of Dr Euan Mackie

This photograph of the interior of Cornaig mill was taken in 1962 by Dr Euan Mackie of the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow. The shaft from the water wheel which turned the grinding stones can be seen protruding through the wall.

The other end of the mill was taken up with the ‘àth’, or drying kiln, which was fired with coal and driftwood washed ashore during the winter. Grain had to be dried before milling and great skill was needed in making sure it did not toast too fast or the flour would be left with a bitter taste.

The grain was poured on to slotted iron sheets above the kiln and two men, with white cloths tied over their boots, turned the grain at intervals with wooden shovels until it was toasted brown.

Black and white photograph of the interior of Cornaig mill in 1962.

The interior of Cornaig mill showing the millstone, photographed Dr Euan Mackie in 1962. (Original in Filing Cabinet 8 drawer 4)

2000.61.21

CD Pròiseact Thiriodh CD-SA1968-35.

Donald Sinclair (Dòmhnall Chaluim Bhàin) of Balephuil talks about meeting a Barra bard, playing board games, sings six Gaelic songs, talks about the meaning of some Tiree words, sings a love song, talks about poverty, paying the miller with flour, herring fishing, second sight, the use of querns and kilns, the mill as social centre and sings a grinding song and a rowing song.

2000.61.47

Mini-disk SA1868/35.

Donald Sinclair (Dòmhnall Chaluim Bhàin) of Balephuil talks about meeting a Barra bard, playing board games, sings six Gaelic songs, talks about the meaning of some Tiree words, sings a love song, talks about poverty, paying the miller with flour, herring fishing, second sight, the use of querns and kilns, the mill as social centre and sings a grinding song and a rowing song.

2004.200.6

Colour photograph of P6/7 beside the old mill at Cornaig in 1994-5.

P6/7 beside the old mill at Cornaig in 1994-5.
L-R: Helen Boyd, Cornaigmore; Donald MacKinnon, Vaul; Christina Cameron, Balevullin; Christopher Gillespie, Crossapol, Hannah Williams, Balemartine; Peter MacLeod, Heylipol; Angus John MacKechnie, Crossapol; Karen MacArthur, Caoles; Calum Williams, Kirkapol; Lyndsay Monaghan, Heanish; David Hunter, Cornaigmore; Iain Brown, Cornaigbeg; Shona MacMillan, Bank House; Suzi MacArthur, Caoles.

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