Tag Archives: food

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2022.11.1

Typed field notes on the Gaelic names and uses of various kinds of seaweed and shellfish, including carragheen, gruaigean, slabhach(d)an, duileasg, duireaman, dulaman, carragan, a’charrag dhubh, sgeamagan, sgeanagan, faochag, maorach, muirsgian, slabhraidh. Includes a barely legible page of handwritten notes.

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Recounted by Tiree people including Jean MacPhail, Donald an tailleir, Annie Kennedy, Willie MacLean, Mary Ann MacDonald, Mabel Kennedy, Mabel MacArthur, David MacClounnan, Alasdair Brown, Jesse Lachainn, Eilidh bheag, Mairi Neill Bhain (Brown), Flora MacDonald, Hugh MacLean, Sandy Ghobhainn, Effie Macdonald, Mary Parkhouse, Donald MacIntyre, Rosie MacIntyre, Mary Straker and James MacLeod, in around 1990.

 

 

2021.53.33

Digitised copy of Observations on Tiree by Dr Walker, 1765. Dr Walker’s observations are arranged under the following headings: situation, extent, hills, harbour, tides, springs, sea, soil, rieve [reef], climate, crops, inhabitants, longevity, diseases, antiquities, agriculture, inclosures, cattle, grain, change of seed, hay, manures, turneps [turnips], price of commodities, price of labour, exports and imports, manufacture, fishery, hemp, natural productions, marble, copper, porphyry. There is no transcript for this item but see 1997.273.1.

The Rev Dr John Walker, minister of Moffat and a pioneer of scientific botany and geology, was sent to the Hebrides in 1764 and 1771 by the Commission for Annexed Estates to report on the social conditions, population and the state of manufacture, agriculture and fisheries.

Click to view a record for this item on Inveraray’s online catalogue.

From the archives of the Dukes of Argyll at Inveraray Castle, made available through the Written in the Landscape project.

2019.73.2

Black and white photograph of members of the MacPhail family of Clachan, Cornaigmore, at a picnic with friends at Kenavara in summer 1936. The small building in the background is thought to be an artist’s studio.

Back row (L-R): Katie McEwan (nee MacInnes) with Anne MacEwan (now MacLean), Mrs Gillanders, Callum MacPhail (father – they had hired his lorry), Mary MacLean (Granny), Mary MacLean (dressmaker), Charlie & Katie Ferguson (nee MacWalters) with Iseabal Ferguson (now Thomson), Laban (blacksmith, Cornaigbeg), Cath MacPhail.

Front row (L-R): Alasdair Campbell (married Grace MacArthur, Tullymet), Iain MacLean, Iain Campbell (married Anne MacArthur), Mairi MacPhail (Gillanders) and daughter, Sheila MacLean (dressmaker), Catriona MacLean (Lal’s morther), Susie MacLean (Malcolm’s wife), Iseabal MacWalters, Mollie Barrow (now McKenzie-Pollock), Isabel MacPhail.

2014.115.23

Newsletter `An Tirisdeach`, No. 455, 20/11/2009

Local news: community wind turbine erected; community Powerdown project – energy awareness training; story-writing competition at school; report of SWRI meeting; report of Tiree Parish Church Guild meeting; report by Youth worker, Sophie Isaacson; report about the school’s Friendly Food cookbook; cattle sale results; Christmas church services.

2014.115.19

Newsletter `An Tirisdeach`, No. 451, 25/09/2009

Local news: Skerryvore perform in China and win A&B’s Young Entrepeneur of the Year; Alan Reid MP visits Tiree; An Iodhlann’s ‘Sheaves from the Stackyard’ – Tiree at war; Lunch Club remembers 1930s Tiree; new social worker for Tigh a’ Rudha; report of Strathclyde fire chief’s visit; policing Tiree Wave Classic; Tiree-Islay exchange; report of SWRI meeting; forthcoming visit by Tobermory lifeboat; school news – fundraising for Mod trip, healthy eating week, new rugby club; letters to the editor – damage to machair at Caoles; volunteers needed for Meals on Wheels; community Powerdown project – solar hot water; poem about wind power by Nik Rawson; sheep sale results; forthcoming boat restoration course.

2019.6.1

Composition by Alistair MacNeill, Hynish and North Berwick, titled ‘The games we played’ about his memories of the games that he and other children at Hynish and Balemartine School played in the 1940s and 1950s.

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