Tag Archives: destitution

2017.50.5

Booklet ‘West Highland Notes & Queries’, Series 4, No. 3, March 2017. Includes articles on the MacLeans of Duart and Lochbuie & the Jacobite Cause 1400-1766 (with references to Tiree), paintings of pipers, ‘The Tacksman Class in Argyllshire 1800-50’, ‘A Visit to Coll in 1831’, and ‘Tiree’s resistance to the Earl of Argyll’s takeover of the Island 1674-1682’ by Nicholas Maclean-Bristol.

2017.26.1

Softback book ‘Correspondence from July, 1846, to February, 1847, Relating to the Measures Adopted for the Relief of the Distress in Scotland…’ Great Britain Treasury, 2012. Government correspondence about Famine Relief in the Highlands. Includes separate index listing references to Tiree.

Click here to view index 2017.26.1 Tiree references

2008.71.1

Colour photograph of the wall at Island House.

The wall at Island House, photographed in 2006 by Claudia Ferguson-Smyth. The wall was one on many built by islanders on `outdoor relief` during the potato famine of the late 1840s.

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2008.61.8

Copy of letter dated 8/6/1883 from Hugh MacLean of Kilmoluaig

Letter dated June 1883 from Hugh MacLean of Kilmoluaig to his cousin with mainly family news but also mentions the scarcities of the previous year and £100 of loans for `needful tenants` to buy seed potatoes and corn in the spring.

2000.61.21

CD Pròiseact Thiriodh CD-SA1968-35.

Donald Sinclair (Dòmhnall Chaluim Bhàin) of Balephuil talks about meeting a Barra bard, playing board games, sings six Gaelic songs, talks about the meaning of some Tiree words, sings a love song, talks about poverty, paying the miller with flour, herring fishing, second sight, the use of querns and kilns, the mill as social centre and sings a grinding song and a rowing song.

2000.61.47

Mini-disk SA1868/35.

Donald Sinclair (Dòmhnall Chaluim Bhàin) of Balephuil talks about meeting a Barra bard, playing board games, sings six Gaelic songs, talks about the meaning of some Tiree words, sings a love song, talks about poverty, paying the miller with flour, herring fishing, second sight, the use of querns and kilns, the mill as social centre and sings a grinding song and a rowing song.

2000.30.9

Periodical `The Coll Magazine`, No. 8, 1990.

Articles about seers, emigration ship `Brilliant`, fishing competitions, poetess and pauper Janet MacLean, the school, the church, model aeroplanes, ducks, views on Coll and the Community Council among others.

2000.199.1

Audio cassette recording of Hugh MacKinnon, Baugh and Angus MacLean, Scarinish talking to Maggie Campbell in 2000.

Hugh MacKinnon of Baugh and Angus MacLean (Aonghas Dhòmhnuill Eòghainn Mhòr) of Scarinish talk to Maggie Campbell in 2000 about the people who used to live in Baugh, the ceilidhs they had at Christmas and New Year, the decline in population, emigration to Canada, the poorhouse, Drs Hunter and Buchanan, farms, horses, other livestock and crops, furniture and house cleaning, the quarry in Baugh, the airport and World War II, the Taeping, sea captains and the changes they’ve seen. Tha Eòghann ’Ic Fhiongain as a’ Bhàgh agus Aonghas Dhòmhnuill Eòghainn Mhòr a Sgairinis a’ bruidhinn ri Magaidh Chaimbeul ann an 2000 mu na daoine a b’ àbhaist a bhi a’ fuireach anns a’ Bàgh, na ceilidhean a bha aca aig àm na Nollaige ’s a’ Bhliadhna Ùr, an dol sìos air àireamh nan daoine, daoine fàgail an dùthaich a’ dhol do Canada, taigh nam bochd, dotairean ’Ic an t-Sealgair agus Bochanan, bailtean-fearainn, eich, beathaichean eile agus bàrr, àirneis agus glanadh taighe, an gairbheal anns a’ Bhàgh, am port-adhair agus an darna cogadh, an Taeping, sgiobairean agus an t-atharrachadh a tha iad air fhaicinn.

2001.97.7

Cases visited in Tiree during the Poor Law Inquiry of 1843

Transcription of an extract from the Minutes of Evidence of the Poor Law Inquiry in 1843 with notes of cases visited on Tiree.

Two Commissioners from the Poor Law Inquiry visited Tiree in 1843, one of whom was shown round a sample of thirty poor families across the island by a Mr MacLean of Hynish. Half of the cases visited were on the Poor Roll and received four to six shillings a year from the Parish.

By 1841 the population of Tiree had swelled to 4,961, double what it had been fifty years previously and more than the island could comfortably support. Nearly half the inhabitants were estimated to be living in deep poverty.

Widows with children and elderly spinsters were particularly vulnerable as were landless cottars without a trade. The able-bodied poor had no legal right to assistance and were expected to find employment on the mainland.