Tag Archives: bronze age

2013.15.1

Booklet `Songs amongst the Stones` 2000

Booklet about the archaeology of Tiree from middens and standing stones, to religions and lifestyle. Researched by Dr John Holliday for a summer exhibition at An Iodhlann.

2006.28.1

Report No. 3 of the Inner Hebrides Archaeologiacl Project conducted by the School of Human & Environmental Studies, University of Reading.

A summary of the activities and results of the second year of the IHAP including a survey on Tiree and Gunna, reconnaisance on Coll and North West Mull, an evaluation of the pottery and metal objects in the Holleyman collection from Tiree and of chipped stone from Oronsay.

2004.219.1

Report on the Tiree Evaluation Survey by Steven Mithen, Tim Astin, Erika Guttmann, Anne Pirie, Sam Smith and Karen Wicks.

Report on the Tiree evaluation survey conducted by Professor Steven Mithen and others from the School of Human and Environmental Sciences, Reading University in the summer of 2004.

2000.95.2

Audio cassette recording of Dr Euan Mackie talking to Dr John Holliday in April 2000.

Dr Euan Mackie, Honorary Research Fellow of the Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow talks to Dr John Holliday in April 2000 about his career in archaeology, the excavation of Dùn Mòr at Vaul 1962-1964, daily life on the dig, his work as director, the changes in thinking of British archaeologists since the 1960s, the history of the occupation of the broch and the likelihood of Stone Age occupation of Tiree. (Continues on AC213)

2000.95.3

Dr Euan Mackie talking about the Vaul broch

Sound clip in English of Dr Euan Mackie talking in 2000 about the excavation of the broch at Vaul.

Courtesy of Dr Euan Mackie

Dr Euan Mackie, Honorary Research Fellow of the Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow and director of the excavation of Dùn Mòr in Vaul, talks to Dr John Holliday in April 2000 about the implications of the dig for Scottish archaeology and for himself personally.

Initially Dr Mackie requested permission from Argyll Estates to excavate a machair site at Balevullin where A. Henderson Bishop had found Iron Age pottery and other artefacts in 1912. This was refused because the area was used for grazing cattle.

An alternative site of the broch at Vaul was acceptable. Dr Mackie directed the excavations there over three seasons in the early 1960s which produced a wealth of material from the late 6th or 5th century B.C. to the 2nd or 3rd century A.D. The finds are stored in the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow.

2004.153.1

Audio cassette recording of a talk `The Archaeology of Tiree` by Professor Steven Mithen in An Talla, Crossapol on 26/8/2004.

Talk ‘The Archaeology of Tiree’ given by Professor Steven Mithen of Reading University in An Talla in August 2004 and introduced by Dr John Holliday. Prof. Mithen talks about the earliest settlers in the Southern Hebrides around 6000BC, their probable lifestyle and tools, the traces they’ve left such as flints, bone tools, middens and charcoal deposits, the survey work the Reading team have been conducting on Tiree including ground penetrating radar and peat cores and the work they hope to do on Tiree in the future.

2001.60.9

Dr Euan MacKie , archaeologist and leader of the excavation of the broch at Vaul, giving a talk there in July 2000.

m91.jpg

Dr MacKie excavated Dun Mor Vaul in the 1960s. The broch measures 9.2 m in internal diameter with dry-stone walls up to 4.5 m thick and once probably 8 m high. Built around the middle of the 1st century AD, the absence of a permanent central hearth suggests it was used originally as a temporary refuge. The upper storeys of the broch were subsequently dismantled and a round-house, possibly an aisled wheel-house, constructed in the interior. It housed a flourishing community engaged in mixed farming, iron-working and bronze-casting. A number of worked bone, pottery, metal and worked stone artefacts were discovered during excavation and are now held in the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow. Radiocarbon dating of organic material indicates that the site was inhabited from the late 6th or 5th century BC to the 2nd or 3rd century AD, though perhaps not continuously.