Tag Archives: brochs

2005.107.1

Iron Age strike-a-light.

Palm-sized round brown pebble with deep straight grooves on both sides. An Iron Age multifunctional tool: the grooves were used as a ‘strike-a-light’, the edges for hammering, and the flat surfaces for rubbing hide. Found near the top of Dun Mor, Vaul, on 27th July 2005 by holiday-maker Kenny Nelson. It may also have been used by sail-makers for sharpening their needles.

Tiree in 100 Objects – 50 – Strike-a-light

The History of Tiree in 100 Objects

2000.162.1

Audio cassette recording of a lecture about brochs given by Dr Euan Mackie in Vaul Golf Clubhouse in July 2000.

Recording of a lecture illustrated with slides given by Dr Euan Mackie in Vaul Golf Clubhouse in July 2000. Dr Mackie talks about the construction and architectural features of brochs across Scotland, the deterioration of many sites and current theories about their evolution from earlier structures. Their uses as defensive structures or as housing for an elite are discussed in a short Q&A session.

2000.95.2

Audio cassette recording of Dr Euan Mackie talking to Dr John Holliday in April 2000.

Dr Euan Mackie, Honorary Research Fellow of the Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow talks to Dr John Holliday in April 2000 about his career in archaeology, the excavation of Dùn Mòr at Vaul 1962-1964, daily life on the dig, his work as director, the changes in thinking of British archaeologists since the 1960s, the history of the occupation of the broch and the likelihood of Stone Age occupation of Tiree. (Continues on AC213)

2000.95.3

Dr Euan Mackie talking about the Vaul broch

Sound clip in English of Dr Euan Mackie talking in 2000 about the excavation of the broch at Vaul.

Courtesy of Dr Euan Mackie

Dr Euan Mackie, Honorary Research Fellow of the Hunterian Museum at the University of Glasgow and director of the excavation of Dùn Mòr in Vaul, talks to Dr John Holliday in April 2000 about the implications of the dig for Scottish archaeology and for himself personally.

Initially Dr Mackie requested permission from Argyll Estates to excavate a machair site at Balevullin where A. Henderson Bishop had found Iron Age pottery and other artefacts in 1912. This was refused because the area was used for grazing cattle.

An alternative site of the broch at Vaul was acceptable. Dr Mackie directed the excavations there over three seasons in the early 1960s which produced a wealth of material from the late 6th or 5th century B.C. to the 2nd or 3rd century A.D. The finds are stored in the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow.

2000.95.1

Harry Kelly talking about Catriona McKinnon of Vaul

Sound clip in English of Harry Kelly talking about Catriona MacKinnon of Vaul.

Courtesy of Mr Harry Kelly

Former chemistry teacher Harry Kelly of Glasgow was recorded in April 2000 talking to Dr John Holliday about the time he spent in the early 1960s as a volunteer at the excavation of the Iron Age broch at Vaul.

When his tent was washed out by rain soon after his arrival, Harry was offered lodgings by Catriona MacKinnon of Rhum View in Vaul. Catriona was a mine of information about life on Tiree in the 1930s.

Much to Harry’s surprise, she had made her own pottery from local clay and dyed cloth with lichens. In this clip, Harry talks about the method she used to make pots.

2001.46.1

Dùn Mòr at Vaul in 2001

Photograph of the broch at Vaul in 2001.

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Excavated by Dr Euan MacKie in the 1960s, the broch measures 9.2 metres in internal diameter with dry-stone walls up to 4.5 metres thick and was once probably 8 metres high. Built around the middle of the 1st century AD, the absence of a permanent central hearth suggests it was used originally as a temporary refuge.

The upper storeys of the broch were subsequently dismantled and a round-house, possibly an aisled wheel-house, may have been constructed in the interior. It housed a flourishing community engaged in mixed farming, iron-working and bronze-casting.

Radiocarbon dating of organic material indicates that the site was inhabited from the late 6th or 5th century BC to the 2nd or 3rd century AD, though perhaps not continuously.

Colour photograph of the interior of the Vaul broch in 2001.

The interior of the broch at Vaul photographed by Catriona Hunter in February 2001. Excavated by Dr Euan MacKie in the 1960s, the broch measures 9.2 m in internal diameter with dry-stone walls up to 4.5 m thick and once probably 8 m high. Built around the middle of the 1st century AD, the absence of a permanent central hearth suggests it was used originally as a temporary refuge. The upper storeys of the broch were subsequently dismantled and a round-house, possibly an aisled wheel-house, constructed in the interior. It housed a flourishing community engaged in mixed farming, iron-working and bronze-casting. Radiocarbon dating of organic material indicates that the site was inhabited from the late 6th or 5th century BC to the 2nd or 3rd century AD, though perhaps not continuously.

2004.161.4

Newsletter of the Tiree Heritage Society `Friends of the Tiree Chapels`, No. 7, 17/8/2004.

News about the Gaelic version of the Pilgrimage Route Guidebook, the information boards for the chapels, broch, ringing stone and Soroby graveyard, the repairs to the bridges at the Kirkapol chapel site and Tobair Eachainn, funding and fund-raising.