Tag Archives: balinoe

2007.25.1

Photograph of Catherine Dash née MacDonald (1844-1890), from Balinoe, around 1880.

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Courtesy of Keith Dash & Doreen Griffin

Catherine MacDonald was born in Balinoe in 1844, the daughter of blacksmith John MacDonald and Flora MacPhail. Her mother died when she was young and her father remarried. In 1853 the family, now with two young sons Hugh and Hector, emigrated to Australia on the S.S. ‘Utopia’. They settled in the goldfields town of Ararat in central Victoria.

In 1866 Catherine married Edward Dash, an English immigrant then working as a clerk in the Victoria Treasury Department. She was twenty-one and he was a forty-seven years old widower with four sons aged fifteen to twenty-two. The couple had another eleven children.

Catherine was described by her children as ‘a gentle, serene woman’ with ‘healing hands’. In 1888 she was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis and she died of this disease in 1890 aged forty-six. This photograph of her was taken around ten years before her death.

2007.25.3

Black and white photograph of Hugh MacDonald (1850-1927) around 1888.

Hugh Macdonald, born in 1850, the son of John MacDonald, a blacksmith at Balinoe, and his second wife, Flora Campbell. In 1853 Hugh emigrated to Australia with his parents, brother Hector and stepsister Catherine on board the S.S. Utopia. He trained as a school teacher and in 1881 married a widow Mary Grace Hamilton. The couple had thirteen children. Hugh died in 1927 of heart failure. The photograph was taken around 1888.

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2007.25.7

Hugh MacDonald with his family around 1900

Photograph of Hugh MacDonald with his family around 1900.

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Courtesy of Barbara Hall & Grace Boyd

Hugh MacDonald was born in 1850, the son of John MacDonald, a blacksmith at Balinoe, and his second wife Flora Campbell. In 1853 he emigrated to Australia with his parents, brother Hector and half-sister Catherine on board the S.S. ‘Utopia’.

Hugh trained as a school teacher and in 1881 married a widow Mary Grace Hamilton with a young son. The couple had thirteen children, twelve of whom survived to pose for this photograph. Hugh was described as ‘a tall imposing man’ and his wife as ‘a small woman always dressed in black’.

Like many other Scots emigrants of the time, Hugh was a very religious man. He was said to be ‘a stern disciplinarian in the true Scottish teaching tradition’ but with a sense of humour. He died in 1927 of heart failure.

Black and white photograph of the family of Hugh MacDonald (1850-1927) from Balinoe.

The family of Hugh MacDonald (1850-1927) around1900.

L-R: (back row) Mona, Hector, Dulcie, Keith, Flora Dash (niece of Hugh, daughter of Catherine MacDonald and Edward Dash), Hugh, Norman, (seated) Daisy, Kate, Hugh senior with Rex, Ruby, Mary Grace (Hugh’s wife), Mavis, Hugh’s stepson Gib Hamilton, (kneeling in front) Eric.

2006.87.1

The MacArthurs’ shop in Balinoe

Photograph of the site of the MacArthurs’ shop in Balinoe taken in 2002.

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The MacArthurs’ shop in Balinoe had one of the first horse-drawn vans, which was replaced between the wars by two motor vans. Calum, who ran the shop and croft with his brothers Colin, Archie and Duncan, was a great businessman.

Once, on his rounds, he was told that he would never be able to sell whelks (winkles), regarded at that time as a poor man’s food. Rising to the challenge, he took a bag around with him the next week and sold the lot in one day!

Around the entrance to the shop there used to be an alleyway of willow trees almost as high as the house, which was known as Taigh nan Craobh (house of the trees).

Colour photograph of the site of the MacArthurs` shop in Balinoe taken in 2002.

The site of the MacArthurs` shop in Balinoe, once known as `Taigh nan Craobh` from the alleyway of willow trees around the entrance to the shop there, photographed by John Holliday in 2002.

2005.52.2

Photocopied collection of witness statements relating to a fishing accident in April 1858 in which four men were drowned in a storm.

Collection of seven witness statements relating to a fishing accident off Balemartine in April 1858 in which cottars Archibald MacFarlane of Balinoe, Alexander MacFarlane of Heylipol, Donald MacLean of Heylipol and John MacLean of Balinoe were drowned during a storm.