Tag Archives: balemartine

1 24 25 26

1997.49.1

Petition from Poor Persons in Tyree for Aid to Emigrate

Transcription of a petition for assistance to emigrate appended to ‘Crofts and Farms in the Hebrides’ by the 8th Duke of Argyll.

This petition was sent in 1851 to Sir John MacNeill, Chairman of the Board of Supervisors for the Relief of the Poor in Scotland. Sir John was married to a daughter of the 8th Duke of Argyll, who appended the petition to his ‘Crofts and Farms in Hebrides’ addressed to the Napier Commission of 1883.

A hundred and thirty-six islanders signed the petition. Ninety-nine of them were landless cottars; the remainder were small tenants, of whom only four paid rent over £10 a year. They represented the class of islanders that the Duke was anxious to clear from his estate.

Around a third of the petitioners were given assistance to emigrate with their families on board the ‘Conrad’, ‘Birman’ and ‘Onyx’ in July 1851. Another twenty-seven families from the island left with them.

1997.48.1

Photocopy of book `Argyll Estates Instructions` edited by Eric Cregeen.

The instructions given by John, the 5th Duke of Argyll to his Chamberlain in Mull and Morvern and his Chamberlain in Tiree with an introduction by Eric Cregeen.

2002.9.1

Audio cassette recording of Alasdair Straker interviewed by Maggie Campbell in Balemartine on 9/10/02.

Maggie Campbell talks to Alasdair Straker of Balemartine in January 2002 about working with Willie Bunting in the 1950s delivering stores to the shops; the ferries; the shops in Balemartine, Balinoe, Balevullin, Baugh, Cornaig, Salum and Vaul and the butchers in Scarinish, Balevullin, Salum and Kenovay.

1998.296.1

Interior decoration in the 1920s

Sound clip in English of Mabel Kennedy talking about interior decoration in the 1920s.

Courtesy of Mrs Mabel MacArthur

Mabel Kennedy talks to Dr John Holliday in October 1998 about the interior decoration of the house at Main Road Farm in Balephuil where she lived until she went to work in service in Glasgow in 1926.

The floors of the house were made of concrete although, at that time, some must still have been beaten earth and clay. Earthen floors were considered warmer for children’s feet than concrete or flagstones and were kept clean by a sprinkling of shell sand every day except Sunday.

The walls inside were painted twice a year with whitewash made from seashells. The difficulty and expense of obtaining household goods on a remote Hebridean island encouraged the resourcefulness of the local people who would make do with the materials to hand.

1 24 25 26