1997.179.8

Marion MacDonald churning butter at Sandaig

Photograph of Marion MacDonald churning butter at Sandaig in the 1940s.

x36.jpg

Courtesy of Ms Linda Gowans

Marion MacDonald was photographed by George Holleyman churning butter outside her thatched house in Sandaig during World War II. The churn consists of a narrow wooden barrel (about 300 mm wide and 650 mm tall) and a plunger. At the end of the plunger is a wooden disc with holes drilled in it.

Milk would be left to stand in a metal basin and the cream skimmed off using a saucer or clam shell into an earthenware butter crock. The cream would be strained through muslin into the scalded churn and agitated using the plunger.

Once the butter had formed, it was put into cold water then slapped between the hands to remove excess liquid. The remaining buttermilk would be drunk or used for baking.

Black and white photograph of Marion MacDonald, Sandaig.

Marion MacDonald is pictured churning butter outside her thatched house in Sandaig, Tiree. The churn consists of a narrow wooden barrel (about 300 mm wide and 650 mm tall) and a plunger. At the end of the plunger is a wooden disc with holes drilled in it. Milk would be left to stand in a metal basin and the cream skimmed off using a saucer or clam shell into an earthenware butter crock. The cream would be strained through muslin into the scalded churn and agitated using the plunger. Once the butter had formed, it was put into cold water then slapped between the hands to remove excess liquid. The remaining buttermilk would be drunk or used for baking.

Object Details

Other Number: X36

Churning butter in Sandaig around 1942

The churn consists of a narrow wooden barrel (about 300 mm wide and 650 mm tall) and a plunger. At the end of the plunger is a wooden disc with holes drilled in it. Milk would be left to stand in a metal basin and the cream skimmed off using a saucer or clam shell into an earthenware butter crock. The cream would be strained through muslin into the scalded churn and agitated using the plunger. Once the butter had formed, it was put into cold water then slapped between the hands or butter pats to remove excess liquid. The remaining buttermilk would be drunk or used for baking.
Normal Location: Photograph Shelves: photographs – X
Current Location: normal location

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *