Dates: 1930s

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2017.54.14

Black & white photograph of a map of Tiree from the Handbook to the Islands of Coll and Tiree, by MacDougall and Cameron, ca 1930. Re-photographed by archaeologist George Holleyman FSA when he was stationed at RAF Tiree during WWII. Scanned from one of his glass lantern slides now held at An Iodhlann (see 2017.54.4).

2018.23.1

Black & white photograph of RAF Serviceman Cliff Barrett inspecting a sea-mine that has washed ashore on a beach in Lewis during WWII. A vast array of sea-mines was installed across the northwestern approaches to Britain in WWII to deter German U-boats. Occasionally, one would break free from its anchor and be washed ashore. Several arrived on the beaches of Tiree, and are still being found to this day.

2018.22.1

Colour photograph of a painting of Malcolm MacLean, Kilmoluaig, presiding over his Inaugural Council Meeting in 1886 as the first Mayor of Vancouver, Canada. Titled ‘The Builders’ and painted by John Innes in 1936, it used to hang in City Hall, Vancouver, but is now preserved in the Vancouver Archives vault, awaiting restoration.

Photo by Kristy Waller, Auxiliary Archivist, 2017. On the left is Louise MacDougall, a Canadian descendant of Tiree, and donor of the photograph to An Iodhlann.

 

2018.15.1

Emailed information about the HF/DF Station at Kenovay. Built in the utmost secrecy during WWII, it was used to track aircraft and German U-boats, and was key to D-Day operations. After the war all traces of it were carefully removed.

It was certainly in use on D-Day! Its exact  location I cannot be sure of but its intended location was MKJM 06593073 using the Georef system which places it at latitude 56 30 43.8N longitude 006 53 24.6W and its role was vital in securing the return of Coastal Command weather recce aircraft. D-Day was to have been 4 June but Gp Capt Stagg advised General Eisenhower that the weather was a no-no but he had reports from a weather ship that indicated that rising pressure and temperature were likely to push the worst weather North.  An elite crew from 518 Sqn on Tiree were tasked to probe into the weather patterns and establish whether or not this was true. They signalled back to the disbelief of the boffins at Dunstable who said “Rubbish!” but the Polish Met observer put them straight and after nine and a half hours the aircraft returned safely thanks to the brilliant crew and also the radio fixes from Tiree. The flight data was absolutely crucial to the D-Day plan. Well done 518 Sqn!!! It was a true team effort by a marvellous crew of eight, Stagg was right, Eisenhower trusted him and D-Day went ahead.”

2018.13.1

Obituary for Major John Campbell (1921-2015), owner of the schooner ‘Oceana‘, which ran aground and broke up on the Baugh end of Crossapol Beach in 1949 under mysterious circumstances. Major Campbell survived shellfire and swamps as he advanced through Italy with Popski’s Private Army during WWII.

Click here to view 2018.13.1

First published in The Telegraph newspaper, 3 September 2015 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/11842074/Major-John-Campbell-obituary.html 

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