Dates: 1900s

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2018.40.1

Softback booklet ‘MacLeans – A Biographical Dictionary of Mull People Mainly in the 18th and 19th centuries’, compiled by Jo Currie, 2002. Includes a section on page 34 about Donald MacLean (McLean; b. 1815) MD, son of the Rev Neil MacLean, minister of Tiree, who was in turn the son of Donald MacLean, minister of the Small Isles.

2017.24.3

Softback book ‘Les Ecossais – The Pioneer Scots of Lower Canada, 1763-1855’, by LH Campey, 2006. Account of the migration of Highland and westcoast Scots to Lower Canada in the 18th century. Although Mull, Arran and Lewis are mentioned, Tiree is not. Includes details of ships transporting people from Scotland to Quebec and passenger lists for ships sailing from Fort William and Saltcoats.

2018.36.1

Academic paper ‘Cholera in Quebec in 1849’ by Prof. Sylvio LeBlònd published in the Canadian M. A. Journal, 1954, describing how cholera arrived at Quebec, Canada, with immigrants from Ireland, how it spread, how many died, how it was treated and the hospital that was set up to deal with it. Tiree people emmigrating to Canada via Quebec in the mid-1800s had to face these conditions, and in 1849, 48 of them died of cholera.

Click here to view 2018.36.1

2018.25.6

Printout from Canada’s Historic Places website about the Bard John MacLean Cemetery in Nova Scotia, also known as Glen Bard Cemetery. Bard John MacLean emigrated from Caoles to Nova Scotia with his wife and three children in 1819. The cemetery is named after him. Contains colour photographs of the cemetery and information about John MacLean.

From www.historicplaces.ca

2018.25.5

Colour photograph of a plaque in Glen Bard Cemetery, Novia Scotia, bearing the inscription “This plaque was unveiled on June 7 1988. It signifies the registration of the Glen Bard Cemetery as a Provincial Heritage Property”. Bard John MacLean emigrated from Caoles to Nova Scotia with his wife and three children in 1819. The cemetery is named after him.

2018.25.2

Colour photographs of the gravestone of John MacLean (1787 -1848), Caoles, in Glen Bard Cemetery, Nova Scotia. Bard John MacLean emigrated from Caoles to Nova Scotia with his wife Isabella and three children in 1819. The cemetery is named after him.

The inscription is in Gaelic. A translation on a metal plaque at the foot of the stone reads: The Bard MacLean, 1787-1848. He who in this cemetery goes around / Stop and listen to a voice from the grave / Keep up the Gaelic all of your life / And hold its poetry in high regard / To all that is good give your love / And live to God each day. The Bard’s Wife Isabella Black (1786-1877), Trust in the Lord with all your heart.

2018.25.1

Colour photograph of the entrance sign to Glen Bard Cemetery in Antigonish County, Nova Scotia, Canada, in 2017. The Tiree poet John MacLean was the first person buried there, in 1848, and the cemetery named after him. Bard John MacLean emigrated from Caoles to Nova Scotia with his wife and three children in 1819.

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