Dates: 1800s

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2018.55.2

Softback book ‘The Campbells of the Ark – Men of Argyll in 1745, Vol. 2 – The Outer Circle’ by Ronald Black, 2017. A portrait of the leading men of Argyll in the 18th Century, and the rising of the ’45 as seen through the eyes of Highlanders who helped to crush it. Volume 2 presents leading characters who were not Campbells, and a study of the 63 local companies of the Argyllshire Militia of 1745-6.

2018.55.1

Softback book ‘The Campbells of the Ark – Men of Argyll in 1745, Vol. 1 – The Inner Circle’ by Ronald Black, 2017. A portrait of the leading men of Argyll in the 18th Century, and the rising of the ’45 as seen through the eyes of Highlanders who helped to crush it. Volume 1 begins with biographies of the 31 Campbells who were subjected to trial by water for their part in defeating Prince Charles’s army.

2018.40.1

Softback booklet ‘MacLeans – A Biographical Dictionary of Mull People Mainly in the 18th and 19th centuries’, compiled by Jo Currie, 2002. Includes a section on page 34 about Donald MacLean (McLean; b. 1815) MD, son of the Rev Neil MacLean, minister of Tiree, who was in turn the son of Donald MacLean, minister of the Small Isles.

2017.24.3

Softback book ‘Les Ecossais – The Pioneer Scots of Lower Canada, 1763-1855’, by LH Campey, 2006. Account of the migration of Highland and westcoast Scots to Lower Canada in the 18th century. Although Mull, Arran and Lewis are mentioned, Tiree is not. Includes details of ships transporting people from Scotland to Quebec and passenger lists for ships sailing from Fort William and Saltcoats.

2018.36.1

Academic paper ‘Cholera in Quebec in 1849’ by Prof. Sylvio LeBlònd published in the Canadian M. A. Journal, 1954, describing how cholera arrived at Quebec, Canada, with immigrants from Ireland, how it spread, how many died, how it was treated and the hospital that was set up to deal with it. Tiree people emmigrating to Canada via Quebec in the mid-1800s had to face these conditions, and in 1849, 48 of them died of cholera.

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2018.25.6

Printout from Canada’s Historic Places website about the Bard John MacLean Cemetery in Nova Scotia, also known as Glen Bard Cemetery. Bard John MacLean emigrated from Caoles to Nova Scotia with his wife and three children in 1819. The cemetery is named after him. Contains colour photographs of the cemetery and information about John MacLean.

From www.historicplaces.ca

2018.25.5

Colour photograph of a plaque in Glen Bard Cemetery, Novia Scotia, bearing the inscription “This plaque was unveiled on June 7 1988. It signifies the registration of the Glen Bard Cemetery as a Provincial Heritage Property”. Bard John MacLean emigrated from Caoles to Nova Scotia with his wife and three children in 1819. The cemetery is named after him.

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