Dates: 1800s

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2017.66.5

CD of 10 Tiree tales from the Dewar Manuscripts (1866) in Gaelic and English, which are held in Inveraray Archives. Story titles: Big Jura John, Big Jura John and the Irish Earl, Gift of Tiree to MacLean by MacDonald of the Isles, The Laird of Callart and the Tenants of Tiree, John Campbell of Barranacarragh in Tiree, Donald of the Sound, Finlay Guibhneach, The Tiree Wrestlers – Malcom Clerk and Donald MacDougall, Grey and Shaw, Traditions about the Island of Tiree and Mull.

Includes photocopied pages of MacLean’s English translation (1881) of the Tiree tales, a printed summary of the tales prepared by the archivist, a letter regarding their use, and a copy of the license agreement between An Iodhlann and Argyll Estates.

Click here to view the summaries

2017.65.5

Transcripts of maritime records of the MacKinnons of Heanish, particularly Captain Donald MacKinnon who sailed the Taeping to victory in the Great China Tea Race of 1866. Researched by Robert Nisbet, Heanish. (1) ‘Captain Donald MacKinnon Timeline’, 1866-1867: dates and summaries of key events from the start of Great China Tea Race to Captain MacKinnon’s death in South Africa, (2) log of RMS Roman, 1867, detailing death of Captain MacKinnon and listing the belongings found in his cabin, (3) details of the estate of Captain Donald MacKinnon, 1867, (4) details of Tiree mariners, 1808-1886, (5) photocopied voyages record of Captain Donald MacKinnon, 1851-1867, from the National Archives in Kew, (6) details from the seaman’s tickets of Angus MacKinnon (b. 1831) and Colin MacKinnon (b. 1834).

2017.65.4

Genealogy material relating to people of Heanish, 1793-2012, from the belongings of Robert Nisbet, Heanish: (1) handwritten family tree for descendents of James Nesbit and Sarah Fritt, (2) printed family tree for the descendents of Neil MacKinnon (1793-1872) and Marion Munn (1800-1887), (3) printed family trees for the descendents of  ? MacKinnon, Donald MacKinnon (1803-1871) and Mary Sinclair (1824-1873), Donald (Red) MacKinnon (b.1773) and Mary McColl (b.1773), Alexander MacKinnon (b. 1846) and Jessie MacDonald (b.1859), Effie MacKinnon (1809-1891) and Coll MacDonald (1806-1883), and Marion Munn (1803-1872) and Neil MacKinnon (1794-1872), (4) family group sheet for Neil MacKinnon (1793-1872) and Marion Munn (1800-1887), (5) printed extract from the 1881 British Census, giving the names and details of 109 inhabitants in 21 houses at Heanish Farm, (6) collection of annotated photocopied birth, marriage and death certificates for Marion MacKinnon, Donald MacKinnon and Margaret Anne Murray (1855), Angus MacKinnon and Catherine Brown (1866), Neil MacKinnon (1872), Euphemia MacDonald (1891), Edward John MacKinnon (1954), (7) notes on other census and genealogy material for family of Neil MacKinnon and Marion Munn (1841), Brown (1861), Coll MacDonald and Euphemia MacKinnon.

2017.64.1

Article titled ‘Tiree and the Dukes of Argyll in the age of the Clearances and Crofters’ War: coercion, controversy and confrontation’ by James Petre, published in West Highland Notes & Queries, July 2017, pp 17-23. An account of how Tiree changed after the Dukes of Argyll took possession of the island in 1674, and the reaction of the islanders to that change.

2017.63.2

Softback book ‘The Escape of Bonnie Prince Charlie’ by Malcolm Seddon, 2016. Describing the adventures of Charles Stewart over five months after his defeat at the battle of Culloden in 1746, including his 500-mile trek over the Western Isles and NW Highlands, and eventual rescue. The French ship carrying him away from Scotland passed close to Tiree, where it is said that two Tiree men from Ruaig were abducted to navigate the ship safely onwards. See ‘Donald the Pilot’ for further information.

2017.51.3

Poem ‘The Sail Weaver’ by Michele Fermanis-Winward, 2017, inspired by the stories of emigration from the Scottish Islands to the New World. The poet’s four-times great grandmother was Mary (McKinnon) MacLean of Tiree, born 1796, and the subject of the poem. Keith Dash (Australia), Mary MacLean (Scarinish) and John Holliday (Balephuil) are mentioned in the acknowledgements.

2017.58.1

Iron cruisgean from Sliabh Cottage, Cornaigbeg.

An iron ‘crusie’ lamp that was used to burn fish oil and once belonged to Mrs Mary Campbell, grandmother of the donor. Notes accompanying the cruisgean tell that it came into the possession of the donor in 1996 and was initially offered to the Thatched House Museum in Sandaig. There it was photographed and returned to the donor with some notes suggesting that it was “an early 18th century iron hanging cruise lamp presented by the late Viscountess Gort”, and that “a cruse is a clay container which could be transformed into a lamp by being filled with oil and equipped with a simple wick – a rag would suffice, but a rush was more efficient and minimised the smoke.”

2014.14.2

Photocopied extract of an article about the location of the Old Norse place-name ‘Isleborg’ in the Argyll Islands, by Dr John Holliday, Balephuil, and the possibility that it refers to an ancient fort on Loch an Eilein on Tiree. Published in West Highland Notes and Queries, Series 4, No. 2, December 2016.

Click here to view 2017.14.2

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