Dates: 1700s

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2019.74.1

Photocopied collection of photographs, will, letters, poetry, newspaper cuttings, family tree and collated information for the MacFarlane and MacKenzie family of Clachan Cottage, Baugh, and Baugh Manse. Key named individuals include the Rev Duncan MacFarlane (d. 1908), Baptist Minister, whose ancestors were brought to Tiree from Arrochar by one of the Dukes of Argyll; Donald MacKenzie, Arrochar (1716-1779); Rev Hector MacKinnon, Tiree; William John MacKenzie, New Zealand (d. 1915); Rev Dr Dugald MacFarlane (b. 1869); Kenneth MacKenzie (1897-1951), Chief Officer of the Antarctic research ship ‘Discovery’ and grandson of Rev Duncan MacFarlane (b. 1866); Catherine (nee MacLachlan), wife of Rev Duncan MacFarlane; Catherine MacKenzie (nee MacFarlane, 1864-1929), daughter of Rev Duncan MacFarlane and mother of Kenneth MacKenzie; Anne MacFarlane (1862-1939), sister of Catherine MacKenzie.

 

2019.69.1

Softback book ‘Tiree and the Dukes of Argyll 1674-1922’ by James Petre, 2019. A concise history of one island during arguably the most dramatic period in Scottish history. A story of change and controversy. At its core are ducal policy, burgeoning population growth, destitution and emigration, followed by government intervention and land settlement.

2019.65.1

Hardback book ‘The Small Regiment, Vol. 1 – Origins of the Clan MacKinnon, 100BCE-1621CE’ by G McKinnon and E E McKinnon. The origins of the Clan MacKinnon and the influences that shaped its history within the context of Hebridean and Scottish history, to 1621. Clan MacKinnon Publishing, Canada, 2017.

2019.41.1

Photocopied academic paper ‘Glasgow pottery at Delftfield: three unrecorded documents’ by Nancy Valpy, 1985, pertaining to the Duke of Argyll’s permission to extract naturally-occurring clay from Tiree for use by the Glasgow Delftfield Pottery in the mid-1700s. “It contains an interesting reference to Scarinish.”

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2019.39.1

Abstract of PhD thesis ‘Vegetation history, human impact and climate change during prehistory:  an island perspective of the Isles of Tiree, Coll and North-West Mull’ by Karen Wicks, University of Reading, 2012. Based on pollen analyses of peat core samples. A digital copy of the full thesis is held on An Iodhlann’s computer.

Click here to view 2019.39.1 abstract

2019.21.1

Genealogical information about the descendants and ancestors of Hector MacKinnon, Vaul (1801-1864), and his wife Margaret MacKinnon, Balephuil, who emigrated to Australia with their four children in 1853. They were living in Balephuil in 1841 before moving to Barra in the mid-1840s, where their fourth child was born. By 1851, the family were living at Petty in Invernesshire. They sailed for Australia from Inverness on board the ‘Bloomer’ in 1853. Includes emailed correspondence regarding links to distant relatives living on Tiree in 2018: MacFadyen, Scarinish; MacKinnon, Balemartine; Cameron, Kirkapol(?).

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2019.16.1

Research by genealogist Flo Straker, indicating that there is NO family connection between Alastair MacLean, author of wartime novels, and Donald MacLean the Cambridge spy, both of whom had Tiree roots. Alistair Stuart MacLean (b. 1922 at Daviot Manse) was descended from Donald MacLean (b. 1729) and Mary Lamont of Heylipol. Donald Duart MacLean (b. 1913 in London) was descended from Alexander MacLean, Cornaigbeg (b. 1732) and Mary MacNaughton (Reid), Kirkapol (b. 1736).

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2019.11.1

Family tree for Donald Brown of Tiree and Australia (1864-1947). Donald emigrated to Yeppoon, Australia, as a young man in 1886. His parents were Hugh Brown and Anne Kennedy of Moss. The family tree traces Donald’s ancestors back to Rory Grahame and Marion MacDonald, who were married in Tiree in 1774, and includes family names Beaton, Kennedy, Cameron and MacDonald.

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2018.55.2

Softback book ‘The Campbells of the Ark – Men of Argyll in 1745, Vol. 2 – The Outer Circle’ by Ronald Black, 2017. A portrait of the leading men of Argyll in the 18th Century, and the rising of the ’45 as seen through the eyes of Highlanders who helped to crush it. Volume 2 presents leading characters who were not Campbells, and a study of the 63 local companies of the Argyllshire Militia of 1745-6.

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