Dates: 1700s

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2018.40.1

Softback booklet ‘MacLeans – A Biographical Dictionary of Mull People Mainly in the 18th and 19th centuries’, compiled by Jo Currie, 2002. Includes a section on page 34 about Donald MacLean (McLean; b. 1815) MD, son of the Rev Neil MacLean, minister of Tiree, who was in turn the son of Donald MacLean, minister of the Small Isles.

2017.24.3

Softback book ‘Les Ecossais – The Pioneer Scots of Lower Canada, 1763-1855’, by LH Campey, 2006. Account of the migration of Highland and westcoast Scots to Lower Canada in the 18th century. Although Mull, Arran and Lewis are mentioned, Tiree is not. Includes details of ships transporting people from Scotland to Quebec and passenger lists for ships sailing from Fort William and Saltcoats.

2018.14.1

Emailed information from the Archivist at Argyll Estates’ archives at Inveraray to Iain Knapman, Balephuil, regarding material relevant to the history of land settlement on Tiree. Includes printouts of the two attachments mentioned below.

“There is minimal published research on the history of the land settlement of Tiree. I understand that TM Devine in his ‘The Great Highland Famine: Hunger, Emigration and the Scottish Highlands in the 19th Century’ (Edinburgh, 2004) refers to there being 329 crofts on Tiree by 1802 and that by 1806 four fifths of Tiree was worked by crofters, but I do not know where these figures come from.

Prior to the establishment of crofts, the land was worked by communal farming settlements of multiple tenant farmers, cottars and servants – the baile. Certainly the 5th Duke of Argyll was keen to improve his lands, and the surveys of the lands and of the people who worked the lands that he commissioned towards the end of the 18th century were intended to inform agricultural improvements and the selection of the best workers to carry them out.

Apart from references in the Instructions that you have read, we hold additional correspondence within the bundle series (see attached list for possibly relevant bundles) and there is also a portfolio of specifically Tiree related material, ref. PV65, which Eric Cregeen listed briefly and which I assume informed his publication of the Instructions. I attach a copy of this list as well.”

2017.65.4

Genealogy material relating to people of Heanish, 1793-2012, from the belongings of Robert Nisbet, Heanish: (1) handwritten family tree for descendents of James Nesbit and Sarah Fritt, (2) printed family tree for the descendents of Neil MacKinnon (1793-1872) and Marion Munn (1800-1887), (3) printed family trees for the descendents of  ? MacKinnon, Donald MacKinnon (1803-1871) and Mary Sinclair (1824-1873), Donald (Red) MacKinnon (b.1773) and Mary McColl (b.1773), Alexander MacKinnon (b. 1846) and Jessie MacDonald (b.1859), Effie MacKinnon (1809-1891) and Coll MacDonald (1806-1883), and Marion Munn (1803-1872) and Neil MacKinnon (1794-1872), (4) family group sheet for Neil MacKinnon (1793-1872) and Marion Munn (1800-1887), (5) printed extract from the 1881 British Census, giving the names and details of 109 inhabitants in 21 houses at Heanish Farm, (6) collection of annotated photocopied birth, marriage and death certificates for Marion MacKinnon, Donald MacKinnon and Margaret Anne Murray (1855), Angus MacKinnon and Catherine Brown (1866), Neil MacKinnon (1872), Euphemia MacDonald (1891), Edward John MacKinnon (1954), (7) notes on other census and genealogy material for family of Neil MacKinnon and Marion Munn (1841), Brown (1861), Coll MacDonald and Euphemia MacKinnon.

2017.64.1

Article titled ‘Tiree and the Dukes of Argyll in the age of the Clearances and Crofters’ War: coercion, controversy and confrontation’ by James Petre, published in West Highland Notes & Queries, July 2017, pp 17-23. An account of how Tiree changed after the Dukes of Argyll took possession of the island in 1674, and the reaction of the islanders to that change.

Click here to view 2017.64.1

2017.63.2

Softback book ‘The Escape of Bonnie Prince Charlie’ by Malcolm Seddon, 2016. Describing the adventures of Charles Stewart over five months after his defeat at the battle of Culloden in 1746, including his 500-mile trek over the Western Isles and NW Highlands, and eventual rescue. The French ship carrying him away from Scotland passed close to Tiree, where it is said that two Tiree men from Ruaig were abducted to navigate the ship safely onwards. See ‘Donald the Pilot’ for further information.

2017.51.3

Poem ‘The Sail Weaver’ by Michele Fermanis-Winward, 2017, inspired by the stories of emigration from the Scottish Islands to the New World. The poet’s four-times great grandmother was Mary (McKinnon) MacLean of Tiree, born 1796, and the subject of the poem. Keith Dash (Australia), Mary MacLean (Scarinish) and John Holliday (Balephuil) are mentioned in the acknowledgements.

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