Sample Our Collection

1997.156.4

John and Christina MacPhail of Balinoe

Photograph of John and Christina MacPhail of Balinoe.

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Courtesy of Mrs Mairi Campbell

John MacPhail (Iain Eacha’ Ruaidh) and his wife, Christina (Hutty Nèill an Tuathanaich), of Balinoe are pictured with a standard plough used for preparing the ground for sowing corn and potatoes.

Out of his working clothes, the crofter is celebrating the end of his spring ploughing. The polished ploughshare is oiled and ready to be returned to the implement shed until the autumn when it will be used for opening potato drills.

The plough is hitched to two exceptionally well-bred Clydesdales of the Tiree type. Introduced in the 1870s, Clydesdales were crossed with local ponies to produce lighter and faster draught animals for which Tiree was famous in the early 20th century.

Black and white photograph of John and Christina MacPhail of Balinoe.

L-R: John MacPhail (Iain Eacha` Ruaidh) of Balinoe and his wife Christina (Hutty Neill an Tuathanaich) with a plough drawn by two exceptionally well-bred Clydesdales of the Tiree type. Out of his working clothes, the crofter celebrates the end of his spring work. Note the polished ploughshare is oiled and ready to be returned to the implement shed till next spring. (Crofting details supplied by Donald MacIntyre, Gott)

2002.73.1

Tilley lamp (minus glass globe), 1925-1950. Tilley lamps were named after John Tilley, inventor of the hydro-pneumatic blowpipe in the early 1800s. Domestic Tilley lamps were fuelled with paraffin, which was pressurised by use of a pump on the base.

1997.170.15

Black and white photograph of the wedding of Hugh Cameron and Margaret MacLaine,`Lochiel`, Cornaigmore, in Glasgow on 23rd December 1923, with best man Dr John Cameron and bridesmaid Marion MacLaine.

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Courtesy of Mrs Mairi Campbell

The bride Margaret MacLaine and the bridesmaid, her sister Marion, are dressed in the fashion of the day with elaborate bouquets. The groom, Hugh Cameron, is in full Highland regalia.

Both families took a keen interest in the Tiree Association which was founded in 1900 to provide a focal point for islanders living in Glasgow. The bride’s father, Neil, was a well-known bard and was prominent in the Celtic movement in Glasgow.

The best man was the groom’s brother, Dr John Cameron. He married Mae Smillie who raised funds for a holiday cottage by the shore in Morvern for the families of ex-servicemen.

2002.58.2

Keyring from Scarinish Guard Room during World War II.

Oval brass keyring 45 mm by 30 mm, stamped on one side with `SCARINISH GAURD ROOM` around the edge and `38` in the centre, and on the other side `W`, an upward-pointing arrow, `D`. In use during World War II. Found on Hough beach by Fiona MacRae.

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